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Steiff in cooperation with National Geographic protects biodiversity

The world is in a state of change. A new record has been reached with about 26,500 threatened species of animals and plants. Margarete Steiff GmbH is fully aware of the present situation and has decided to support measures to preserve biodiversity. Margarete Steiff Gmbh is launching a new series in collaboration with National Geographic. These new products are intended to bring the public’s attention to threatened species. Part of the proceeds from the sale of Steiff animals will be donated directly to National Geographic which is supporting the National Geographic Photo Ark and other world-wide scientific efforts. The National Geographic Photo Ark is a multi-year effort founded by photographer Joel Sartore. Its aim is to document every species living in zoos and wildlife sanctuaries all over the world, inspire action through education and help save wildlife by supporting on-the-ground conservation efforts. Find more information at www.NatGeoPhotoArk.org

"Photo Ark" is a biodiversity conservation effort founded by the well-known photographer Joel Sartore and supported by National Geographic. Joel Sartore has made it his life’s work to produce a visual ark documenting all animal species in human care. To date, he has completed intimate portraits of more than 9,000 species in his “Photo Ark” archive. His artistic and stunningly beautiful close-ups on a plain black or white background place a special focus on each animal. They emphasise the beauty, uniqueness and fragility of each species and highlight the importance of saving animals in order to preserve our plant. Indeed, Joel Sartore is certain of one thing: “We only protect what we love.”

PHOTO ARK and © Joel Sartore
© 2020 National Geographic Partners, LLC. All rights reserved
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC and Yellow Border Design are trademarks of National Geographic Society, used under license.

The green and golden bell frog is classified as critically endangered. This species is represented here by Froggy frog. Its family home is in Australia and New Zealand. As a ambassador of its species, it now sends out a warning. Froggy frog is 12 cm tall and made of cuddly soft plush fabric. The fog’s mouth and nostrils are reproduced by brown airbrush applications. The typical colour combination from which it gets its name is printed onto the plush fabric. Its toes are produced by stitching on all four feet. Since the population of this species has dropped by about 30 percent over the past ten years, Froggy frog has the task of attracting attention to this problem. These ambassadors manage to give a special meaning to a collection by the high-quality workmanship of the best materials. The existence of many species is threatened by the reckless use of hazardous substances and the decimation of the habitat. Another cause is the change in climatic conditions. Froggy frog is a warning and a symbol for the loss of wonderful creatures.

He glides through the water full of trust and with easy movements. This is how everyone knows the Caribbean manati. And that’s the whole tragedy. Hunting and injuries from ship’s propellers and fishing tackle have finally led to this species becoming seriously endangered. This friendly animal is represented by Sian Caribbean manati. He is 33 cm long and made of cuddly soft plush fabric. His face is coloured brown by using airbrush applications. His species lives in the warm coastal waters of the Caribbean. This is where this friendly animal is exposed to danger from fishing and passing boats because of its slow movements. It’s also why there is an alarming decline in its population. Sian Caribbean manati would like to draw people’s attention to this problem. Children will find him to be an unusual cuddle mate and will raise their awareness for rare species at an early age. A friendly trusting animal that radiates cosiness. As part of a collection, Sian Caribbean manati is sure to draw your attention to a different kind of creature. A gift idea for people who appreciate something special.

The volcano rabbit is faced with a drastic deterioration in its habitat. This animal only lives in the proximity of two volcanoes in Mexico. That’s where he gets his unusual name from. Vula volcano rabbit was designed to create awareness for this cute creature. A symbol for a creature which is the victim of humans clearing its habitat by fire to produce grazing land. Vula volcano rabbit is 23 cm long and made of cuddly soft plush fabric. The typical grey/brown colouring and sitting position are perfectly reproduced by this endangered animal. Its face and head are coloured brown by using elaborate airbrush applications. The inner ears are in pink. Vula volcano rabbit makes a special gift for anyone who appreciates the beauty of this rare animal. The threat to the existence of this species may mean that this symbol will be all that is left. Seeing this little creature in a collection can promote awareness and stroking its soft fur may awaken the desire to protect this rare species.

Kari hawksbill sea turtle has swum here from far away – hoping to find her new home with you. She's part of our new National Geographic series introducing you to endangered species. Hawksbill sea turtles live on the coast of Cuba, the Dominican Republic and Venezuela, among other places. They are hunted frequently for their meat and eggs. The species is classified as "critically endangered", which means that they are very close to extinction – so international protection is important! Give Kari a new home – she'll thank you for it and quickly become a valued new member of the family. The lifelike turtle is 32 cm tall and is made of soft and cuddly printed fabric. She is both a playmate and a helpful object for learning about the animal.

National Geographic Tami monkey is a cuddly creature standing 23 cm tall. She is modelled after animals from the marmoset family, a species that is highly threatened due to the destruction of its habitat due to deforestation in the rainforest. Due to their cute appearance, these little monkeys are also caught and kept as pets. They are on the Red List of Threatened Species and are at risk of extinction. But this one is made of soft and cuddly plush fabric. Her little face is grey and her head is full of long white plush fabric. The airbrush technique uses brown to add emphasis to her claws, the edge of her ears, her mouth and the mask of her face. She has a white stomach that transitions to a brown back with a long bushy tail. The supporting rods in her front legs help her keep her pose while sitting. This cute, lovable friend will remind your child of the beauty of the animal kingdom and makes for an exotic-looking playmate.

Meet Hummi, the Humboldt penguin from our new National Geographic series of endangered species. Hummi and his fellow Humboldt penguins live amongst others on the Pacific coast of Peru and Northern Chile and are unfortunately listed as an endangered species. Humboldt penguins are classified as "endangered." Humboldt penguins belong to the branded penguin classification. It is estimated that only 32,000 fully grown Humboldt penguins remain on the Pacific coast. Hummi is 35 cm tall with soft and cuddly fabric and airbrushing on his feet that give him a lifelike appearance. Tell your child about Hummi, and learn together with him about protecting endangered species – not only in zoos, but especially in their natural habitats. Hummi and his friends in South America will thank you and your family!

This is Chinchi, an 18 cm tall chinchilla from the National Geographic series. The natural habitat of this cute little rodent is the Andean state Chile in South America, where it lives in mountainous regions. Due to its extremely soft fur, this animal is hunted extensively in the wild and is at risk of extinction. The risk is made even worse by the fact that the animal is captured and kept as a pet. Chinchillas are exported and sold around the world to owners who keep them in cages. Inspired by the beauty of his real-world counterpart, Chinchi is made from incredibly soft plush fabric in grey/white. The brown facial features with beautiful grey shading as well as pinkish inner ears and nose centreline work together to form his adorable little face. His little pink paws stick out from under his cream-coloured belly. His white whiskers just make children want to pet and pat him that much more.

A new member of our National Graphic collection is Ozzi. Our new member of the National Geographic family looks a little frightened – and for good reason. The ocelot lives in South America and is on the red list for endangered species. It is hunted everywhere, mostly for its unique coat.Our ocelot would be very happy to get a chance to move in with you and find safety as your new family member. He is also a playmate for your child and is just as happy to snuggle as it is to play and frolic. His soft and cuddly, brown striped coat makes him a real cuddlecat. Special mention should be given to his black and white ears and bean bag at his seat.

Lori parrot is a wonderful member of our National Geographic collection. Colourful Lori has characteristic blue-yellow colouring made from soft, strokable plush material. He is 26 cm in size and attracts attention from grown-ups and kids alike. Lori has a magnificent face with beautiful black makings under his eyes. The beak and feet are done in grey. The wonderful dark-blue shade of the macaw runs from his head over his wings and all the way down to his tailfeathers. His chest is characteristically yellow. The same yellow was used for the undersides of his wings and tailfeathers. His stability and his wonderful feel in your hand are helped by a bean bag sewn into his bottom and supporting rods in his feet. Lori's population is unfortunately on the decline. This is why the species appears on the list of endangered species. His habitat is disappearing due to deforestation. Illegal hunting for him is also causing the population to shrink.

A charming member of our National Geographic collection is Boogie. This is Boogie, the grey gorilla from the National Geographic series. He is 35 cm tall and made from incredibly soft plush fabric. Boogie does just fine in a nursery. His real-life counterparts in the African rainforest are not doing so well. They are on the Red List of Threatened Species. This grand and powerful animal is at risk of extinction due to the destruction of its habitat and poaching by irresponsible trophy hunters. Boogie represents this wonderful species, which has strong protective instincts and a tremendous family bond. National Geographic Boogie gorilla stands on his own and has soft plush grey fur with beautiful shading that transitions from his body to his haunches. The middle of his head is brown. The intricate airbrush technique using black from head to foot complements this charming creature perfectly. He is an understanding playmate and cuddling partner for your child. He has a friendly face that will liven up your nursery and he loves to go on adventures.

Sheila baby seal is a charming member of our National Geographic collection. She has big wide eyes that let her look out into the world with curiosity. The underbelly, face and inside tail fin are made of soft and cuddly plush fabric in grey/beige. An elegant airbrush design in grey adds a nice touch to the streamlined body. Special colour details were used for Sheila: Pink around the mouth, spots on her back and a pretty dark brown around her eyes. Her nose is black and her cute whiskers are white. At 23 cm long, Sheila belongs to the largha seal species. It lives in the Sea of Japan, Bering sea, Yellow Sea and in the Arctic Ocean. Soft Sheila can be found on the list of endangered species. This is because her habitat is threatened due to overfishing as well as industrial and military pollution. Other factors threatening this species of seal include the expansion of trade and industrial areas as well as global warming.

A charming member of our National Geographic collection is Bongo. The National Geographic Bongo dangling gibbon is 46 cm tall. This species is on the Red List of Threatened Species and is at risk of extinction. The gibbon lives in the Asian rain forests along with his mate and usually two to three children. When swinging from tree to tree, gibbons can clear a distance up to twelve meters in one jump. The primary reasons why they are dying out include the following: Destruction of their habitat, poaching and illegal trade. This gibbon here is made of soft and cuddly plush fabric with blond tips. His face and chin are dark brown. His inner ears and sides of his face stand out for their light brown tone. A dark brown plush fabric with long strands adds some fun to the head. His soles are beige. The gibbon's belly, the backs of his hands and the top of his feet are cream-coloured. A black airbrush was used to create the nostrils, mouth and eyes and make them stand out. Brown has been used around his face and for his fingernails. The areas where his paws connect to his limbs also feature brown shading. This cute, lovable friend will remind children of the beauty of the animal kingdom and makes for an exotic-looking playmate.

A new member of our National Graphic collection is Mizzy lynx. He lies down with pride and features a wonderful plush coat in beige and brown. Mizzy lynx is 35 cm in size. The lynx tufts on the ears and the nose are decorated in black. His face is lifelike with an airbrush paint job using ecru, brown and chestnut. The velvety-soft paws and the soles are offset in light brown. A wonderful animal. And yet, Mizzy lynx is on the list of endangered species, where he is ranked as "critically endangered". In his habitat of Spain and in the bushland, he is hunted illegally. Continually growing cities and the expansion of agriculture and forestry are making his habitat smaller. Even increasing road traffic is presenting major problems for him. The lynx population is currently recovering thanks to strict measures for protecting biodiversity and the support of organisations like National Geographic.

A charming member of our National Geographic collection is Hedda hippo. Hedda's family comes from a part of Africa south of the Sahara. The hippo is made from grey-brown faux fur that's too soft to resist stroking. The supporting rods in her legs help her to keep a standing pose. The charming Hedda is on the list of threatened species and is ranked as "critically endangered". Her habitat is disappearing due to mining and timber harvest. In addition, wars, military operations and illegal hippo hunting are causing a decline in the population. Hedda is 43 cm in size. Detailed airbrush techniques in pink decorate the neck, eyes, mouth and inner ears. Her stubble, mouth lines and eyes are dark brown. Skin colours accent the nostrils, inner ears and inside of the mouth. Hedda's watchful, loving eyes will capture your child's heart. Nice and cuddly: For loving, playing, cuddling and telling stories.